One lump or two? The history of afternoon tea.

Milly Lawson


Region:
East Midlands
Notice Period:
Short (maybe less than one month's notice)
Type:
Professional
Fee:
Paid: £80 - £120
Category:
History
Updated:
30th July 2022

The history of afternoon tea encompasses dangers and scandals unknown to the average tea slugger of the British Isles. An innocent afternoon spread of tea, sandwiches, cakes and sweet treats for many in history bought war, addiction, poison, slavery, dept, death, female liberations and fashionable rivalry. Join Mildred Freeman, The Lady Historian to discover the true story of our afternoon feast. The humble afternoon tea will never seem the same again!

Views: 422 | Enquiries: 1

About Milly Lawson

With a passion for sharing history through story telling, songs and comedy Mildred Freeman was a character created by Milly Lawson whilst working at one of the last remaining music halls in the UK. With a background in heritage, education and as a professional cellist and performer, Milly researches, creates and delivers her history talks in an entertaining, insightful and (sometimes) very dramatic fashion.

Milly lives in Long Eaton, Nottingham with her loving husband (Mr Butler) and her young sons Ezra (the young squire) and Gideon (the young master). In her free time Milly can usually be found watching costume dramas whilst knitting and sipping hot coffee (or gin, depending on the time of the day).


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